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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 18, 2017 3:00pm-4:01pm BST

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rwanda, senegal, slovakia, thailand, the united kingdom and uruguay. most of all, i thank all of you. the fact that so many are committed to seeing the united nations succeed is gratifying. it is a sign not only that change is desperately needed but that it will be achieved. you are the reason change is coming to the un. it is now my honour to introduce someone who is no stranger to change. donald trump as a businessman's — seeing potential, and he sees great potential, not just in this reform movement but in the united nations itself. he shares your commitment to creating a more effective advocate for peace, security and human rights. we are deeply grateful he has taken the time to be with us today. ladies and gentlemen, president donald j time to be with us today. ladies and gentlemen, president donald] trump. applause well, thank you very much. thank you. i actually saw great potential
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right across the street, to be honest with you, and it was only for the reason that the united nations was here that that turned out to be such a successful project. so i want to thank you, ambassador, for your introduction and for your steadfast advocacy of american interests on the world stage. under half of the co—host countries i would also like to thank secretary—general, and you have been fantastic, forjoining us, and we affirm our commitment to the united nations reform, and reform is what we are talking about. i applaud the secretary—general for setting out our vision to reform the united nations so it better represents the what we represent. we endeavour to live across the entire system and to find ways the united nations can better and be better at development, management, peace and security. the united nations was founded on
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truly noble goals. these include affirming the dignity and worth of the human person, and striving for international peace. the united nations has helped advance towards these goals in so many ways, feeding these goals in so many ways, feeding the hungry, providing disaster relief, and empowering women and girls in many societies all across the world. yet in recent years the united nations has not reached its full potential because of bureaucracy and mismanagement. while the united nations on a regular budget has increased by 140% and its staff has more than doubled since 2000, we are not seeing the results in line with this investment, but i know that under the secretary—general that is changing, and it is changing fast, and we have seen it. that's why we commend the
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secretary—general and his call for the united nations to focus more on people and less on bureaucracy. we seek a united nations that regains the trust of the people around the world. in order to achieve this, the united nations must hold every level of management accountable, protect whistle—blowers, and focus on results rather than on process. to honour the people of our nations, we must ensure that no one and no member state shoulders a disproportionate share of the burden, and that is militarily or financially. we also ask that every peacekeeping mission have clearly defined goals and metrics for evaluating success. they deserve to see the value in the united nations, and it is ourjob to show it to them. we encourage the secretary—general to fully use his authority to cut
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through the bureaucracy, reform outdated systems and make firm decisions, to advance the un's core mission. further, we encourage all member states to look at ways to ta ke member states to look at ways to take bold stands at the united nations, with an eye towards changing business as usual and not being beholden to ways of the past, which were not working. mr secretary—general, the united states, and the member states, present today, support this great reform vision. we pledge to be partners in your work, and i am confident that if we work together and champion truly bold reforms, the united nations will emerge as a stronger more effective, more just and greater force for peace and harmony in the world. thank you, mr secretary—general, and i look forward to advancing the shared
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goals in the years to come, and it isa goals in the years to come, and it is a great honour to be with you today. thank you. applause thank you, mr president. i came to the united nations about the same time as the secretary—general. he andi time as the secretary—general. he and i share a mission to find value in the un, we share the goal of a better united nations. not a cheaper un ora more better united nations. not a cheaper un or a more expensive un. better united nations. not a cheaper un ora more expensive un. not better united nations. not a cheaper un or a more expensive un. not a smaller one or a bigger one. a better united nations. an organisation with the trust and the capability to deliver on its mandate to promote peace, security and human rights. over the past eight months, he has been a partner and become a friend. his leadership brings us together today. ladies and gentlemen, secretary—general antonio guterres. applause
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mr president, thank you very much for your engagement and your support. and i also thank ambassador haley for leadership and commitment. ladies and gentlemen, someone recently asked what keeps me up at night, and my answer was simple. bureaucracy. for augmented structures, procedures and endless red tape. someone trying to undermine the un could not have come up undermine the un could not have come up with a better way to do it than by imposing some of the rules we have created ourselves. it even sometimes ask myself whether it was a conspiracy to make our rules exactly what they need to be for us not to be effective, but above all that us not forget that we are here
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to serve. to serve the people. people suffering, in poverty or exclusion, people victimised by conflict, people whose rights and dignity are being denied, but also people with ideas and dreams who need a helping hand. reform is for them. but reform is also for the hard—working taxpayers who earned the right to all the crucial work we do. and it is for eve ryo ne crucial work we do. and it is for everyone serving under the un flag, all of them deserve the conditions to do their vitaljob, to serve the people we support, and the people who support us, we must be nimble and effective, flexible and efficient. and we must also be keenly aware of our obligation to live up to the values of the united nations charter. together, we are making progress on a broad and bold reform agenda to strengthen the united nations. we have launched a game changing strategy to end the
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sexual exploitation, we have embarked on plans to achieve gender parity in the un, to protect whistle—blowers and strengthen counterterrorism structures. and we are reforming our peace and security architecture to ensure we are stronger in prevention, more agile in mediation, and more effective and cost effective in peacekeeping operations. we are reforming our development system to become much more focused, well coordinated and accountable to better assist countries to the 2030 agenda for sustainable development, our contribution to a fairer globalisation. to underpin all these efforts, we a re globalisation. to underpin all these efforts, we are carrying out sweeping management reforms, to decentralised decisions with greater transparency, accountability. these effo rts transparency, accountability. these efforts reinforce each other and they are all grounded in overarching principles. we are a global
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organisation. 90% of our personnel serve in the field. and we need to bring decision—making closer to the people we serve. trust and empower managers, reform cumbersome and costly budgetary procedures and eliminate duplicate structures. mr president, you often have said, and you repeated today, that the un has tremendous potential. all of us have the responsibility to make sure we live up to it. our shared objective isa live up to it. our shared objective is a 21st—century un, focused more on people, less on process. as you rightly said, also more on delivery, less on bureaucracy. we know that the true test of reform will not be measured in words in new york or wild capitals. it will be measured in tangible results in the lives of the people we serve, and the trust of those who support our work through their hard earned resources. value for money, while advancing
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shared values. that is our common goal, and i thank you very much for your support for these vital efforts. mr president, many thanks. applause thank you, mr president and mr secretary—general. today is a great day but it is the beginning of a process, not the end. there are 193 members of the united nations. that means there are about 70 member states out there who have not yet signed the declaration of support for united nations reform to stop our mission is leaving here today is to not be satisfied with less than a complete consensus on this reform agenda. we are always stronger when we speak with one voice, and the future of this institution is worth
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the extra mile. our goal is to convince the delegations that have not yet signed the declaration to join the effort for more efficient, accountable and transparent un. the united states believes we can make history by coming together as a true global community for reform. in the coming weeks and months we will be considering the secretary—general's broader vision. this is an opportunity for all of us to seize this moment and ensure that the united nations remains relevant. we must challenge traditional mindsets, inertia and resistance to change. we will do this together. i hope we can count on your help. thank you again, and let's make it a new day at the united nations. applause so that was the us ambassador to the un, niiki haley, there, thanking the secretary—general guterres for his words, very much supporting the call from the us president donald trump,
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saying that the un has not reached its full potential, as its budget has increased. he said the united nations should rely less on bureaucracy, more on people, and that phrase was used again by the un secretary—general antonio guterres, who has said that the un should be "value for money." focused more on people and less on process. but as niiki haley was pointing out, it needs the backing of 193 sovereign states, all with different agendas, for that wish to become reality at the un. a building that donald trump said of course he knows well, because trump tower, his base for his business, is just because trump tower, his base for his business, isjust a because trump tower, his base for his business, is just a few hundred yards away from the building. so the gladhanding continues at the un. president donald trump, his first visit to the un as speaker, and
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calling for reform, and getting a warm calling for reform, and getting a warm welcome, it has to be said, from the un secretary—general. so thatis from the un secretary—general. so that is the situation in new york. we will be getting reaction from our correspondent who is outside the un building, very soon. here... the most senior official in the government's brexit department has left his job, after reports of tensions between him and the brexit secretary david davis. oliver robbins is moving to downing street to work more directly for theresa may. a spokesman for number 10 said the appointment would "strengthen coordination" of brexit across the government, as the next round of negotiations with brussels approaches. it comes as downing street insists the cabinet is united behind the government's plans for leaving the eu, despite the foreign secretary's decision to publish an article setting out his own vision for brexit. our political correspondent leila nathoo reports. the most eye—catching claim from the referendum campaign — since widely discredited, but this weekend boris johnson revived it, saying that brexit would mean roughly retrieving about that much of an eu, and arguing it would be a fine thing that was spent on the nhs.
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it led to the uk's most senior statistics official, sir david norgrove, saying he was surprised and disappointed the foreign secretary had chosen to revisit the number, warning it was a clear misuse of figures. boris johnson hit back, saying his article had been wilfully distorted and misrepresented. as statisticians the test that we must set ourselves, are we helping to clarify the big debates of the day? it is not ourjob as the statistical community to tell you what the answer is. but the british public have a right to know what the real numbers are, and to put them into context. i think that is what the statistics authority was try to authority was trying to do on this occasion. so what does the argument over the figure centre around? borisjohnson and other leave campaigners claimed that in august 2014 the uk gave £350 million a week
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to the eu. the uk's gross contribution was actually £361 million, but crucially the rebate is removed before any money sent to brussels. so the amount sent to the eu in 2014 was £276 million a week, after the rebate. brexiteers insist there will be huge sums to reclaim after we leave. everybody knows it is an awful lot of money. so wouldn't it be more productive to discuss how we will spend that money when we come out, and also to discuss the point that many of us don't think there is any moral or political or legal reason to go on paying them, once we have left? indeed, i think it would be illegal to go on paying them once we have left. this tussle over numbers is a side story to the debate still going on in the cabinet about what brexit looks like, just days before theresa may is due to make a major speech to try and break the deadlock in the negotiations. downing street said
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it was important that all cabinet ministers were united around the government's decision. but borisjohnson's intervention, setting out his own ideas. leila nathoo, bbc news. with me is lord ricketts, former permanent secretary at the foreign office and a former british ambassador to france. this news that oliver robbins is moving, i mean anybody watching, they will think, it is a civil servant member from one they will think, it is a civil servant memberfrom one department to another. is it a big deal?|j don't to another. is it a big deal?” don't think it is as big a deal as some are making it out to be. he is not leaving his job some are making it out to be. he is not leaving hisjob or the government, after all. not leaving hisjob or the government, afterall. he not leaving hisjob or the government, after all. he is clarifying his role, actually. this quy clarifying his role, actually. this guy has been carrying an impossible board for the last year, the prime minister's special adviser on the eu, head of this new department created with david davis, and our negotiator in brussels, and i think thatis negotiator in brussels, and i think that is just an impossible load, so it clarifies lines of command in whitehall. is that diplomatic speak for he didn't get on with david davis and he wanted to move?” for he didn't get on with david davis and he wanted to move? i don't know, i can't answer on the personal
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side but in terms of the way whitehall normally runs it is defaulting back to how it normally operates. normally the secretary ru ns operates. normally the secretary runs the department, the prime minister has her adviser to coordinate across the whole of government. the oddity has been this last year rather than the shape it is now ticking. from the outside, this looks like a dreadful mess at a really crucial time in this country's history? —— the ship —— shape it is now ticking. they have been working on this and they are up to speed. the crucial thing is that the prime minister's speech really marks move forward in the negotiation. that clock is ticking and she really needs some decisions made on the transition and on the money in time for friday. you mentioned the timing. how crucial was that article by borisjohnson, putting out his view on brexit? he has been misquoted, some would say, in parts. but how helpful will that be as these negotiations reach this crucial point? i think to say it
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would be helpful is probably an exaggeration. —— and helpful. i think it contradicts the run—up to this big florins speech and the stuff behind it. i don't think it helps the civil servants trying to produce a coherent policy here to have all these different voices coming in from left and right at the political level. said article 50 got the go—ahead we have pretty much heard that britain didn't want to have to reveal its hand. is theresa may of friday actually going to have to say to europe, this is what we are offering? yes, we had been beginning to lay out our hand over the summer with these papers, but i think now is the time for some political choices, what kind of a future we want in europe. and we cannot go on playing games in this negotiation with the clock ticking. if we can't get it clear we are going to have a transitional period, shortly investors will start leaving, talented people. leaving this country, and it will be too late to keep what we need here. and
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not just if there late to keep what we need here. and notjust if there is a transitional period, but how long it will be? yes, and if it is effectively the same rules applying for the transitional period. i don't think there is time to negotiate a new conjugated arrangement. we need to be able to tell people living here and businesses working here that the rules will go on being the same. it mightjust explain the role of someone mightjust explain the role of someone like olly, as you call him, and david davies? if they are sitting in a room with the eu negotiators, who is doing what?m david davis looking to oliver for advice, or is it a two way street? it is the typical british arrangement with the minister is in charge, you know, he is the electorate representative. the civil servant is there advising him, but the minister does not stay through all the nitty—gritty of 3—4 days of negotiation, so as we have seen david davis tends to come in and do the opening and closing, and then the opening and closing, and then the two or three days of hand—to—hand fighting, as it were, is led by the official, who will continue to be olly robbins, so
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there is continuity in the british representation in negotiations. and you're confident that?” representation in negotiations. and you're confident that? i am confident he will go on doing a highly professionaljob, confident he will go on doing a highly professional job, i confident he will go on doing a highly professionaljob, i do think it has got a bit more difficult as a result of this change —— a bit more doable as a result of this change. thank you. police are continuing to question two men after a device partially exploded on the tube in south west london on friday, leaving 30 people injured. police have been searching a chicken shop in hounslow in west london, where a 21—year—old man was detained on saturday night on suspicion of terror offences. he's a syrian refugee who appears to have been living in the uk for four years. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds reports. this is a 24/7 investigation. late last night, detectives were still removing potential evidence from a fast food shop in hounslow, west london. it was raided on saturday. they'd arrested one man here, surrounding him with offices in overalls, a precaution to ensure any potential forensic evidence on his clothes is not contaminated.
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he is 21—year—old yahyah faroukh, believed to be from syria. the bbc has been told he worked in the shop, which is being searched by detectives. ya hyah fa roukh lives in this modern development, close to the southern boundary of heathrow airport. it's also been taped off, and is being subjected to a close search. he is linked to this house in sunbury—on—thames, about five miles away, still surrounded by metal barriers and tents put up to protect evidence. this picture of yahyah faroukh was taken in the street outside of the house, and posted online nearly five months ago. ron and pennyjones, who live here, have fostered teenage asylum seekers. he may have been one of them. neighbours say another young man who arrived a few weeks ago appeared desperate to run away, and came to the attention of the police. i saw one arguing with him. so i went out and asked what was wrong. it was a new kid, 15,
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didn't want to come into the house, he came from kent and he said he wanted to go to london. numerous police cars were parked outside the house when i drove past, but it's been ramped up over the last 2—3 months, with police coming out to the house. the police get called, so that's why there will be a police presence at the house. whether it means that the lad has actually caused trouble per se, who is to know? it is speculation. police say an 18—year—old linked to this address was arrested in dover and is being questioned. cctv evidence is at the corner of the investigation. this image obtained by itv news was captured close to the house in sunbury—on—thames. the key question — did this man with a lidl bag place a bomb on the london underground, also in a lidl bag? burning and terrifying innocent commuters. tom symons, bbc news. matthew thompson is in sunbury—on—thames where police are carrying out an intense search on a property. they will also be looking at cctv
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images, more of which seem to be appearing? yes, absolutely. you can see appearing? yes, absolutely. you can see behind me it is very much an ongoing police investigation. that lilac has you can see over the top of that police cordon is we know the house of the early foster carers in whose clear we know that both of the men so whose clear we know that both of the men so far arrested in this case at one stage or another live. from another camera angle we can bring you, we can show you the front of this house, and there are a two forensic tents there. another one read the back that you can't quite see, but very much an ongoing forensic investigation here. this is a developing situation. more information emerging all the time. in the last few moments of the sun newspaper claimed to have got their hands on more recent cctv footage than the one we brought you in tom's report there. they claim this is a man walking along vicarage road, not farfrom man walking along vicarage road, not
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far from where man walking along vicarage road, not farfrom where i am standing, carrying a lidl bag. it is too difficult to see whether it is the same man difficult to see whether it is the same man in the cctv footage we brought you earlier, whether it is the bomber in question, but it does seem the bomber in question, but it does seem this is the epicentre of this police investigation. it also emerged earlier today the 21—year—old man, the syrian refugee, who was a arrested in hounslow on saturday night, ya hya who was a arrested in hounslow on saturday night, yahya faroukh, and the bbc were able to speak to the order of that chicken shop, and this is what he had to say... they didn't tell us anything about the investigation. thee gave no details out about the investigation, they searched lockers, and that was it. we were closed her for hours, and then they went. what was he like? we don't know him very well. yes, he was employed over here. he was quite quiet. he just worked over here and that was it. how long was he here for?
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i don't know those details. i work here mainly in the front, so i don't know the details of how long he was here. yes, he is familiar. we do recognise him. he is a member of staff, so, yes, he was working here. what was he doing? mainly he wasjust making chicken. where was he from? i believe originally he probably was from syria, so he was probably a refugee. i don't know those details. now, we also know that that man, 21—year—old yahya now, we also know that that man, 21—year—old ya hya fa roukh, now, we also know that that man, 21—year—old yahya faroukh, attended west college in south—west london —— west college in south—west london —— west tha m es west college in south—west london —— west thames college in south—west london. the man arrested in dover on saturday morning we believe to be an 18—year—old iraqi refugee who also lived at this house at some stage. but of the three places, the police have been searching an address in hounslow, the chicken shop, another residential address, and this one, but none quite have the scale compared to what you see behind me, and this shows we think that police
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see and this shows we think that police see this as the centre of investigations and where they think this bomb was prepared. thank you very much. president trump has said the united nations cannot fulfil its potential until it tackles bureaucracy and mismanagement. the un secretary—general has said progress is already being made. let's go to our correspondent at the un. he was pretty blunt in his message? yes, although this was pretty mild compared to other criticisms donald trump has levelled at organisations, if you remember his labelling nato obsolete. but he was talking now about the whole issue of united nations reform. the united states is the biggest contributor to the un budget, providing 22% of the general budget, 28% of the peacekeeping budget for peacekeeping operations around the world. the us has threatened to slash those contributions but now
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there is a reform programme underway at the behest of the united states and donald trump complimented the un secretary general antonio gutierrez, and this is what he had to say. —— the terriers. —— antonio guterres. we will have that a little later, laura. he has met the general secretary before, but there was a lot of gladhanding? yes, certainly. this was a meeting that the un had called, 120 countries at this meeting the united states was chairing, and donald trump met with the british foreign secretary boris johnson, and you can see the two of them shaking hands there. and of course them shaking hands there. and of course reform of the united nations is also something on the agenda of britain. britain is also a major contributor to the un budget, but really all eyes are on donald trump for his big speech tomorrow in front
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of world leaders when he is expected to address what he sees as the threat from iran, as well as north korea. everyone is very interested to see what tone he strikes, but based on the tone he struckjust know which seem to be that he was critical of the un, he was also constructive, so that i think will be welcomed by world leaders here, who never quite know what to expect with donald trump. yes, interesting. he started off by saying trump tower is very near where you are, sort of thanking the un for their business, it seemed to me? actually wasn't even it seemed to me? actually wasn't even talking about trump tower which is ten blocks away, but talking about a building which is right across about a building which is right across the street that he owns. and, yes, he plugged that at the beginning. i don't suppose that was in his script. he also said one of the reasons for the success of his building, he seemed to be implying, its proximity to the united nations, so asa its proximity to the united nations, so as a lifelong new yorker, a real estate developer, he has had a rather vexed relationship with the un, and he put in a bid to renovate the world body when there was a big renovation a few years back and he
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was turned down, the un feeling he would not be a reliable partner in the renovation, and he has never forgotten that, but today he got to return in triumph as president. 0k, thank you for that, laura trevelyan from new york. and some breaking news. in the last few minutes the trust involved in the death of connor sparrowhawk has made a statement. was this in no way compensates for the losses family has suffered, it has led to significant improvements in the trust. there have been times when our actions unintentionally led to the stress of connor's family. we
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hope all families and service users will now experience a more compassionate approach from southern health." rather a strong statement there from the interim chief executive at southern health trust. headlines coming up in a couple of minutes but let's cross to get the weather in the meantime with matt. thank you. as we finish the afternoon and go into the evening rush hour, across western areas of the uk we have clear skies, west of scotland, northern ireland, the west of wales and cornwall. this zone of cloud and a few showers through scotla nd cloud and a few showers through scotland down into parts of wales. the east of england, east anglia, perhaps a small chance of rumbles of thunder on the coast. temperatures on the face of it are high but here when the breeze is at its coolest. some rain coming and going across england and wales for a time and that largely fed southwards. one or two might leftover showers on tuesday morning, but the emphasis will be on dry weather for many to
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structures did. a few mist and fog patches and it is still rather pull out there. parts of rural scotland and northern ireland having a touch of frost. but tomorrow, uk wide, the driest and brightest day of the week. one or two might very isolated showers, perhaps in northern england, but i think you will get away dry, the most of you, crowding into the west later on. light winds of recent days will make it feel a touch warmer as well. the full update is coming up in half an hour. i will see you then. hello. this is bbc news with simon mccoy. the headlines at 3.30pm: ryanair have said that they expect to see compensation claims of up to 20 million euros for planned flight cancellations. the top official at the department for exiting the european union, oliver robbins has left his post, amid claims of tension between him and the brexit secretary. mr robbins will be moving to work directly for the prime minister in the cabinet office.
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police are still questioning two men arrested after the bomb attack on a tube train in parsons green. they are believed to be a 21—year—old syrian refugee and an 18—year—old man. a cyclist who killed a woman while riding an illegal track bike is sentenced to 18 months in a young offenders' institution. wayne rooney has pleaded guilty to a charge of drink driving at a court in stockport. the footballer has been sentenced to 100 hours of unpaid work and received a two year ban from driving. let's catch up with the sport. it's tim. hello. hello, simon, thank you very much indeed. ahead of england's opening world cup qualifier against russia tomorrow night, manager mark sampson says he's not allowing the recent controversy surrounding eni aluko's discrimination case to affect the team's preparations. forward aluko and midfielder drew spence have both submitted evidence against sampson, though he's been cleared of any wrongdoing in two separate investigations. the important thing is to be
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professional. we understand that there is a huge media interest and public interest in the investigations, but from our point of view, the players have got a job to do. we are representing england tomorrow and these players have worked incredibly hard their whole lives to be given the opportunity to represent england and we are focussed on that and making sure we can produce the best we can. i have made it clear my stance on the allegations and as we sit now, we are 24 hours away from an important world cup qualifier and we are asking people to respect that's the case. mark sampson has been fantastic for my career. he gave me a chance initially to play for england and you know, not onlyjust getting the opportunity, it's the technical detail. it's improving me as a footballer and as a person. i have said it before, and i'll say it again, this is the most together team i've ever been involved in. the
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most positive environment and best team culture i have been involved in andi team culture i have been involved in and i have been involved with a lot of clubs and that along with the foot ball of clubs and that along with the football side of things has really helped me develop as a player. efl cup ties dominate midweek football, with sixteen ties spread across tuesday and wednesday. tottenham's game against barnsley takes place on tuesday with the spurs boss still painfully aware that his side has yet to win a domestic fixture at their new home, wembley. we can do better. we are struggling maybe to take some because we dropped many points at wembley in the three games that we have played against chelsea, burnley and swansea and we won against everton and newcastle. we started well in the champions league. i am happy. ten years after turning professional, rory
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mcilroy has been added to the field for next week's british masters at close house in the tournament where he made his pro debut. the world number eight is joined in northumberland by several of his 2016 ryder cup teammates, including masters champion sergio garcia and tournament host lee westwood. the northern irishman failed to qualify for the pga tour's season—ending tour championship yesterday in his attempt to defend the fedexcup title he won last year. england and the west indies begin their five match one—day series at old trafford tomorrow. jonny bairstow has been selected to open the batting with alex hales. the former england captain andrew flintoff says he believes the current england test squad is probably the "best ever", following their series wins over south africa and the windies this summer. the former all—rounder is also full of praise for captainjoe root, ahead of the winter's ashes series. he's got the perfect team to do it about. i think that team he's looking after are probably the best england team. we have got to find
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that consistency, they win games, they lose teams, but the team is england. he is the most successful england. he is the most successful england captain than i ever was and it will be a tough winter for him with the ashes. the three—time squash world champion nick matthew has announced that he'll retire at the end of the forthcoming season. the former world number one could play his last event at the british open in the spring. before that matthew will bid to win a fourth world title in manchester at the end of the year and another commonwealth games gold next april. that's all sport for now. hugh ferris will have more in the next hour. thank you very much for that, tim. some breaking news. we'rejust hearing, this is from theresa may, who has been flying to ottowa, accompanying her, journalists including john pinaar. this is a day
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after two senior cabinet ministers rebuked boris johnson for after two senior cabinet ministers rebuked borisjohnson for back after two senior cabinet ministers rebuked boris johnson for back seat driving. theresa may has told journalists the government is driven from the front. she also in effect issued a reminder that money saved asa issued a reminder that money saved as a result of brexit will be spent in ways decided by the government, asa in ways decided by the government, as a hole, not by individual ministers. this follows the row over boris johnson's assertion ministers. this follows the row over borisjohnson's assertion that much of the cash saved when britain leaves the eu could be directed towards the nhs, a repeat of a controversial claim of the leave campaign in the eu referendum and that apparently surprised downing street, but theresa may refused to be drawn into the whole wrangle over his decision to repeat the claim and insisted as i say that this government is driven from the front. we will be getting more on that visit. theresa may meetingj we will be getting more on that visit. theresa may meeting j justin throu due. justin the canadian prime
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minister. president trump has made his first appearance at the united nations in new york calling for "bold reforms" of the organisation. the trump administration wants to streamline the bureaucracy and get other countries to cover more of the costs. iaid i aid plaud the secretary general for laying out a vision to reform the united nations. so that it better serves the people we all represent. we support your efforts to look across the entire system and find ways the united nations can better and be better at development, management, peace and security. we can now speak to edward mortimer — a former communication director for kofi annan when he was un secretary general. he's in our oxford studio. the difficulty in any organisation let alone one this size, but getting them done are very different things?
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people started advocating eu reform when the eu came into existence in the 19405. every new secretary general sets out a reform programme and just about every us president calls for reform of the un. obviously this is a particularly difficult combination when you have somebody like donald trump who came in with a view that the un was pretty much of a useless talking shop. he seems to have revised that, at least partially, and he has recast his reformed proposals in terms of support for the secretary general rather than holding the secretary general to account which was apparently what it said in the original draft and he has got 120 countries at this meeting convened today by the united states. so, that's a majority of the membership. so while it is very far from a done deal, i think that the signs for
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reform are a bit more hopeful than one might have thought a few weeks ago. the interesting thing about this, of course, that many people will agree with donald trump because they share that outsider‘s view of this organisation. what is the real frustration? you work there?” this organisation. what is the real frustration? you work there? i did. it can be very frustrating. that's probably true in any large organisation and some small organisations. bur october crassy and turf battles are more or less pa rt and turf battles are more or less part of human nature. the problem with the un is its governing body, the general assembly, composed of over 190 sovereign states. and at least legally speaking they are all equal. so that small a small pacific island as the same vote as china. in the security council, it is a different story, but when it comes
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to administrative reform and the budget, it is the general assembly and its committees that take the decisions and a lot of these small countries and developing countries are suspicious that the big countries that provide most of the money and the united states are really trying to take the organisation over and use it for their own purposes and even when the secretary general suggests something which i would say appears manifestly in the interests of many developing countries, it is often treated with great suspicion by the membership because the secretariat is seen as being some sort of weapon in the hands of the united states. so, the fa ct hands of the united states. so, the fact that trump is supporting this on balance is positive, but it will bea on balance is positive, but it will be a bit double—edged on balance is positive, but it will be a bit double-edged focus more on people, less on process, but the reality is money talks? well, that's
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true and also, i think the fact in order to deliver things to people, you do need a process. the process has to be in some degree a democratic one and take account of different views. if one country could decide what was best for the world and call the shots then you wouldn't need a un at all. so i think that a degree of frustration and delay is almost an inevitable pa rt and delay is almost an inevitable part of the process and while it is good that efforts are being made to speed things up and make them more efficient, i think one shouldn't have too many illusions that this will suddenly be transformed into a com pletely will suddenly be transformed into a completely different organisation. that's not going to happen. you are a former communications chief for kofi annan. you now live in oxford. are you enjoying a quieter life? somewhat, yes. it was working on the 38th floor which is where the secretary general‘s office was, was
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quite an intense and extremely interesting and on the whole rewarding experience. yes, i think there are also interesting things happening in oxford and some communication between the two. thank you very much. it is a pleasure, thank you. ryanair say they expect compensation claims of up to 20 million euros following their planned flight cancellations. the airline is under pressure to publish a full list of the flights it plans to cancel over the next six weeks, amid growing anger among customers. they have cancelled dozens of flights every day until the end of october, after it said it "messed up" the planning of pilot holidays. but so far so far ryanair has only published a list of affected flights between now and wednesday. earlier i spoke to the bbc travel show‘s simon calder as he was waiting to board an ryanairflight at stanstead airport.
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i have the flight to barcelona and it is due to be setting off soon. however, there will be about 15,000 people today across the ryanair network who will not be travelling anywhere and the bulk of those will be flying to or from london sta nsted, be flying to or from london stansted, the airline's main base. how did they get away this, simon? first of all, it is an extremely unusual set of circumstances. it appears to have been building for the past couple of weeks and certainly the chief operations officer sent out a letter to pilots about last wednesday saying there we re about last wednesday saying there were problems and trying to persuade them to maybe work harder. it is a difficult combination between the fa ct difficult combination between the fact that airlines want their pilots to work through the summer and they have changed their annual leave calendar and you have got this almighty squeezing together of the possible times when pilots could ta ke possible times when pilots could take holiday and some of them are taking it because they want time off. others are taking them because they have reached their flight time
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limitations which carefully stimulate the number of hours that a pilot can work in a period of 28 days or indeed up to a year. depending on who you talk to. there isa depending on who you talk to. there is a lot of people who suggest you go to bea is a lot of people who suggest you go to be a pilot at ryanair to cram in the hours before you get the experience to go off to another airline. is the problem that some of them are going to another airline? there are rumours them are going to another airline? there are rumours about pilots going to this airline or another airline or whatever. it's difficult actually to substantiate that. generally, of course, there is progression away from ryanair towards course, there is progression away from rya nair towards other airlines. that's the true, many ambitious men and women who want to become pilots. it isa and women who want to become pilots. it is a great way to build up hours. and there is definitely an appetite amongst norwegian and jet 2 pilots. the thing is at this time of year as we are going into the winter season
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that appetite is rather dull, so any stories you have seen of 300, 500, # 00 pilots going from raver r ryanair to those airlines i would treat with care. ryanair would say, yes, we messed up, it is a short—term blip, but we are doing everything to fix it. i calculate up to 400,000 passengers between now and the end of october are going to find their flights messed up. that's only, i make it 2.5% of total passenger carrings. if you're one of those make sure you get your entitlements and that includes 250 or 400 euros, depending on how far you are flying and it includes if you are waiting for a later ryanair flight, and it includes if you are waiting for a later ryanairflight, hotels and meals until they can get you home and crucially, it will, although, there is no definition of this, entitle you if you are facing a long wait to look on a rival airline, but that's the bit of the law that at the moment is looking
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very fuzzy and the civil aviation authority really needs to come out and say what it believes that the rules to be. there is a news conference at 4pm with the ceo, michael o'leary. if you were with the ceo, michael o'leary. if you were there what would you ask him? how does europe's biggest airline manage to get itself in a muddle and please give us certainty about the flights that are going to be cancelled. i'm one of several million people booked to travel next month and i have got no idea if my plane is going to get off the ground unlike the one this afternoon! and off he went. that was his call. the headlines: ryanair says it expects claims of around 20 million euros in come centre passion after plans to cancel up centre passion after plans to cancel up to 50 flights a day. the news conference at 4pm. the government's top brexit official leaves his post top brexit official leaves his post to work in downing street amid
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reports of tensions with the brexit secretary, david davis. police are still questioning two men after the parsons green bombing including a syrian refugee. good afternoon, i'm jamie good afternoon, i'mjamie robertson. firms who fail to pay the minimum wage — predominantly employ women, according to a new report. the low pay commission — which advises the government on minimum wage levels — says women are also the least likely to complain about underpayment. ryanair is under pressure to publish a full list of the flights it plans to cancel over the next six weeks, amid growing anger among customers. the airline said this weekend that it would cancel 40—50 flights every day up until 20 september after it "messed up" the planning of pilot holidays. but it's only published a limited list of affected flights. theresa may is in ottawa to intervene in a row between the us and canada over aircraft.
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the canadian firm bombardier — which employs 4000 in northern ireland — has been accused by us rival boeing of unfairly receiving state aid. but since the uk government relies on votes from northern ireland to push through legislation, the prime minister is keen to make sure jobs are safeguarded. black, asian and minority ethnic staff who work at accountants pwc in the uk earn almost 13% less than other employees. the figures come from pwc itself. the firm said its bame workers were statistically paid less because more of them worked in administrative and junior roles, rather than senior ones. laura hinton, is head of people, pwc. is there a problem here? there is a problem, but it's really important
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to be clear what that problem is. we don't have a pay gap because we pay different staff that do jobs different staff that do jobs different pay. we are really trying to encourage debate and transparency to encourage debate and transparency to understand the issues so that we can tackle the problem and address the gay gap. what about the gender pay gap? yes, it is a very similar issue. we have a gender pay gap of a similar proportion and what we know, we we re similar proportion and what we know, we were the first organisation, certainly one of them to publish our gender pay gap and by being transparent and setting clear targets we have managed to close the gap over time. we are hoping that that we are able to do the same if we can drive the debate. what about getting job—seekers into higher levels of management. how do you do that? we have to spend more time
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really understanding the challenges. so we have spoken to 150 individuals within the firm to understand what challenges do they feel on a day—to—day basis? are there barriers that they feel are impacting their choices as to whether to stay with us or to progress or move else and only by understanding the challenges by being accountable for closing the gap, will we be able to make a difference. it is a complex area. people are less comfortable talking about a ba me pay gap than around gender because they are worried about saying the wrong thing and not necessarily using the right terminology so encouraging the debate and really speaking to those people who are impacted to understand what is going on and having a clear action plan is our approach to addressing it. who is best placed to doing something about this, companies or government or any organisations? it is everybody. a collective responsibility here around how do we make a difference within our profession within, within society as a whole. some of this element is societal. so there are responsibilities on government, on
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businesses, to really understand the issues and be accountable and really tackle the issues in the same way and with the same energy as we have tackled the gender pay gap. thank you very much. households are feeling the tightest squeeze on their finances in three years and the bank of england's signal that it is getting close to raising interest rates could put pressure on the purse strings. the monthly household finance index from the research group, ihs markit says uk families have been hit by rising inflation and weak pay growth. the survey says the amount of cash available to spend fallen at one of the steepest rates in three years. chris williamson, the chief economist, at markit explained how interest rate changes might impact households. higher interest rates will have a mixture of effects. on one hand save rs mixture of effects. on one hand savers will benefit. savers have been crying out for higher interest rates for a long time. especially the older generations which are the main savers so they will see some
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increase in their interest payments so increase in their interest payments so it is good news for them. the other positive effect is that it will drive the pound up so we will have less imported inflation and that should alleviate it squeeze on households, two good positive effects. the negative side, of course, is that it inches up borrowing costs and this is for mortgages and other people with debt. so that sector of the household economy will get squeezed. now, we have got to remember, this is only a very small rate hike. they are talking about at the moment from very low levels so i think the bank of england is looking at this more like it's withdrawing some of the extraordinary stimulus it put in place bringing things back to a more appropriate level. those are the markets. e sure
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those are the markets. esure up those are the markets. e sure up to 5.5% to 277 pence. it is following reports that its founder is hoping to sell his controlling stake. it is about 30%. shares in bae systems are up 2.8% after qatar's defence minister signed a letter of intent to buy 24 typhoon jets. the move could anger other gulf countries that are boycotting doha. that's all the business news. television's top awards, the emmys, have been handed out in los angeles. veep was named best comedy, while the handmaid's tale took the top drama series. and as peter bowes reports it was a politically charged ceremony. # everything is better on tv... a song and dance routine
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to celebrate television from streaming services to mainstream tv. but this was a show rich in political satire. there were constant digs at donald trump. the host, stephen colbert, even ridiculed the former reality tv brought on a special guest. this will be the largest audience to witness an emmy. the president picked up an award, sort of, his impersonator alec baldwin won for best supporting actor in a comedy. i suppose i should say at long last mr president here is your emmy. british winners included the comedian john oliver, charlie brooker, for the dark satirical drama black mirror, and riz ahmed for the drama the night of. big little lies was one of the big winners.
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nicole kidman took best actress, and her co—star reese witherspoon accepted the award for best limited series. and can ijust say — bring women to the front of their own stories. for donald glover, two awards for directing and acting in the comedy about the atlanta. i want to thank trump for making black people number one on the most oppressed list. he's the reason i'm probably up here. the emmy goes to the handmaid's tale. the night's top award for a story about a totalitarian society won eight emmys for the streaming service. with hollywood films struggling to find an audience, viewers are turning to the small screen, from the tv set to the tablet, television on all of its platforms is enjoying a golden age.
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we are expecting a news conference in dublin, ryanair. michael o'leary, the ceo, is holding that news conference. it looks like it is imminent. we're going to go to the weather. across the newsroom is matt taylor. matt, if i scream, it's because i wa nt matt, if i scream, it's because i want you back! 0k. ok. i'm listening. let's start on hurricane maria. it is not only an expanding storm, but a strengthening storm. it is to the east of martinique. it is a category two. it could have a direct impact on dominica and push westward and could become a category 3 or category 4
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storm. a massive storm. big impacts particularly later this week. back home, it is quieter. the only thing that's concerned us has been the chill. the mornings have been cold. this is the scene in long sutton, that's not far from yeovil and temperatures were close to six celsius, but we will notice a change. these are the overnight temperatures, how we start our morning commute, it will be a good deal milder out there. still a chill. the winds are coming from a general northerly direction. lively showers. east anglia and the south east, the odd rumble of thunder. more in the way of cloud and less in the way of sunshine. driest weather in the west, but through tonight, the outbreaks of rain we see across england and wales will become more and more isolated, pushing their way southwards and eastwards leaving showers. most becoming dry and clear skies, a few mist and fog patches, but cool. temperatures in rural
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spots of scotland could be close to freezing as we start tuesday. but tuesdayis freezing as we start tuesday. but tuesday is looking like a fine day for many of us. for this week, it will be the driest and sunniest day of the week. the morning chill goes and the mist and fog patches go. one or two isolated showers. good sunny spells. temperatures 15 to 18 celsius with lighter winds and it will feel warmer than it has done for a good few days. things get warmer as we go for a good few days. things get warmer as we go into wednesday. it is because of the area of low pressure out to the west of ireland helping to draw our air from the at lantic instead helping to draw our air from the at la ntic instead of helping to draw our air from the at lantic instead of the arctic. there will be rain to go with. wet and windy at times scotland and northern ireland. driest and sunniest throughout east anglia and the south east. temperatures may get above 20 celsius. and as we go through wednesday night and into thursday, the rain gets heavier and it separates brighter, but fresher conditions pushing into the west and
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the warmest weather still in the south—east corner. temperatures above 20 celsius. this is bbc news. ryanair says it expects claims of around 20 million euros after plans to cancel up to 50 flights a day. we will hear from the company's boss, michael o'leary in the next few minutes, we will bring you that to you live from dublin. police are still questioning two men arrested after the parsons green bombing — including a 21—year—old syrian refugee. after borisjohnson is accused of back—seat driving over brexit — theresa may insists the government is being "driven from the front." donald trump tells the united nations to make itself more efficient. we seek a united nations that regains the trust of the people around the world. in order to achieve this, the united nations must hold every level of management accountable, protect whistle— blowers, and focus on results rather than on process.

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